Browse Resources by Topic

2005 – Earth Observation

SIA reported that revenue for global commercial satellite remote sensing increased approximately ## percent from 2004 to 2005, driven by evolving business opportunities, new and continuing military and intelligence imagery contracts, and expanding civil and commercial imagery markets, including online mapping services. The SIA includes remote sensing as part of its FSS revenue estimate.

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2005 – Satellite Television

Direct-to-home television services (referred to as DBS or DTH services) represent the largest portion of satellite services revenue. SIA estimates 2005 DBS/DARS industry revenue of $## billion, which yields a DBS estimate of $## billion net of the $## million in 2005 revenues reported by the three DARS providers (Exhibit 4l).[SIA estimates DBS subscribership at ## million in 2005. In-Stat, in its 2006 report, Worldwide Satellite Pay-TV Market, puts 2005 DTH television revenue at $## billion. Additionally…

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2005 – Satellite Radio

Revenue in 2005 for satellite radio was about $## billion, from three firms: XM Radio, reporting 2005 revenues of $## million; Sirius Satellite Radio, reporting 2005 revenues of $## million; and WorldSpace, reporting 2005 revenues of $## million. SIA’s estimate for this segment is not released separately from its DBS estimate.

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2005 – Satellite Communications

SIA’s Satellite Industry Survey does not report telephone trunking revenue (i.e., telephony-related revenue from transponder leasing) separately, but as part of the FSS market. SIA also includes VSAT revenue, revenue from data and video transponder leasing, and remote sensing in FSS revenue, for a total of $## billion. Euroconsult lists FSS market revenue as $## billion for 2005; this number is based on revenues from all 36 FSS satellite operators.

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2005 – RDT&E and IR&D funding

Independent Research and Development (IR&D) costs are estimated at $## billion, half of which was retroactively funded by the DoD. Assuming that the proportion of aerospace IR&D to space IR&D is the same as the proportion of aerospace research, development, test, and evaluation (RDT&E) ($## billion) and space RDT&E ($## billion), the IR&D covered by corporations is about $## million.

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2005 – Space Insurance

The revenue for space insurance in 2005 was $## million.

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2005 – Ground Stations and Receivers

Ground equipment revenues were $## billion in 2005, according to SIA data. These revenues include infrastructure elements such as mobile terminals, gateways, control stations, as well as end-user equipment such as very small aperture terminals (VSATs) and ultra small aperture terminals (USATs), direct-to-home (DTH) broadcast dishes, satellite phones and digital audio radio satellite (DARS) equipment.

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2005 – Satellite Manufacturing

According to the SIA, 2005 total commercial and government satellite manufacturing revenue was $## billion. Of this, ## percent of revenue was from government satellites ($## billion) and ## percent was non-governmental ($## billion). This number counts the revenues for the payload in the year in which it was launched, not necessarily the year the revenue was realized. Also, the revenue is totaled in then-year dollars; it is not adjusted for inflation.

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2005 – Economy Overview

According to the FAA, the international commercial launch vehicle industry generated $## billion in revenue in 2005. The Satellite Industry Association (SIA) estimates the total launch vehicle industry at $## billion, including government and commercial (See Exhibit 4b). While the SIA does not break out revenue by commercial and government, it notes that, of the ## commercial launches in 2005, ## percent were government customers, and ## percent non-government.

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2005 – Government Space Budgets Overview

Non-U.S. military estimates, which are for 2004, include the following countries: United Kingdom, France, Russia, Germany, Belgium, Spain, Italy, and Israel. China’s budget includes both military and civil expenditures. Note that the estimate of China’s space budget is controversial. At a NASA budget hearing in April 2006, much of the discussion was about the possible size of China’s space program and its ability to complete its plans to land astronauts on the Moon in 2017.

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