2010


2010 – U.S. Civil Space Budgets – Snapshot

In certain agencies, such as the USDA, space spending is distributed in small amounts across the agency for activities such as the purchase of remote sensing data, and therefore space budgets are not systematically tracked. In other agencies, such as the Department of Interior, space spending is concentrated in a single organizational or functional line item. Within the DOI, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) operates the Landsat Earth observation satellite program and associated mapping and data products. In 2010, USGS spent approximately $## million dollars on Geographic Research, Investigations, and Remote Sensing, which included the Landsat program and a geospatial data program.

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2010 – Satellite Manufacturing – Snapshot

In 2010, a total of ## satellites were launched into space, up by #% from the ## satellites launched in 2009. This total includes most spacecraft but excludes missions to the ISS and launch vehicle demonstration missions. The ## satellites represented approximately $## billion in manufacturing revenue. This figure represents a ##% decline from the 2009 total of $## billion.

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2010 – Launch Industry – Snapshot

In 2010, ## orbital launches occurred carrying ## payloads into space. These payloads included satellites, other types of robotic spacecraft, and cargo and crew missions to the International Space Station (ISS). Compared to the ## launches that took place in 2009, the launch rate in 2010 represents a #% decrease, discontinuing a five-year annual average growth rate of #% from 2005-2009.

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2010 – United States Government Space Budget – Snapshot

U.S. government agency space budgets in 2010 totaled $## billion, a ##% increase from 2009. The combined U.S. defense-related space activities, including the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), the National Reconnaissance Office, and the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, totaled $## billion, or ##% of U.S. government spending. This figure, when combined with NASA’s budget, accounts for ##% of all U.S. government agency space budgets. The remaining ##% is comprised of space-related spending within a set of other U.S. government agencies such as the Department of Agriculture (USDA), the Department of Energy, the FAA, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), the Department of the Interior (DOI), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the National Science Foundation, which collectively budgeted $## billion on space.

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2010 – Government Space Budgets – Snapshot

While the United States accounts for ##% of global government space spending, on par with recent years, a large and growing number of countries appropriate sizeable sums for various space programs. Government space programs accounted for approximately $## billion in spending during 2010, which represents about a third of the total global space economy.

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2010 – Economy – Snapshot

The global space economy continued to demonstrate strong growth in 2010, increasing by ##% to reach a record total of $## billion. This figure shows the continuation of a five-year trend of expansion in the space economy, demonstrating growth of ##% from $## billion in 2005. While many other industries declined in recent years due to the recession, growth in the space economy as a whole was at least #% every year.

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2010 – Demographics – Snapshot

The United States, Canada, and Europe together comprised about 35% of first-degree STEM graduates. Japan and South Korea comprised 8% and 6%, respectively, while Australia comprised 2%. Europe led in STEM doctoral degree production, comprising 44% of the total as of 2006 and experiencing growth of 29% between 2002 and 2006.

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2010 – Degrees Awarded – Snapshot

While mechanisms such as the PISA test reveal a cross-national focus on primary and secondary STEM competency, a more direct measure of the potential international space workforce is offered through a comparative analysis of STEM university graduates by country.

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2010 – European Space Industry Employment – Snapshot

Despite the recession and financial crisis, the European space workforce has continued to add jobs. According to data collected by Eurospace, the nonprofit European space industry association, 31,369 full time equivalent (FTE) employees worked in the European space sector in 2009. This marked a net increase of 1,068 FTEs, or 3%, between 2008 and 2009.

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